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Calcium in Your 30-50s: More Than Just Healthy Bones

J. Hsu
December 27, 2023

As you advance into your 30s and beyond, you likely start to notice some changes in your body that signal your mortality. Your energy levels may decrease, injuries take longer to heal, and you realize that your body is no longer quite as resilient as it once was in your youth.

One of the most important factors determining how you age and how long you will live is the health of your bones and skeletal system. Calcium is essential for building and maintaining bone strength and density, among a host of other functions.

If you want to enjoy an active, independent, and long life well into your golden years, you must ensure you are getting enough calcium and maintaining proper levels.

TLDR: Calcium is essential for building and maintaining bone mass and density as you age.

  • Without enough calcium, bones become porous and fragile, increasing risks of fractures and breaks.
  • Consuming enough calcium through diet and supplements can lower osteoporosis, help maintain mobility, and support a longer lifespan.
  • The best calcium sources are dairy products. Aim for 1000 mg daily through diet. Use supplements if needed.
  • Weight-bearing exercise like walking and strength training also strengthens bones as you age.

What is Calcium?

Calcium is a mineral essential for building and maintaining bone health.  Calcium is also important for other bodily functions like muscle movement, nerve signaling, and maintaining a regular heartbeat.

Why Calcium Matters for Health as You Age

As you get older, calcium becomes increasingly important for maintaining health and preventing disease.

For Strong Bones

As you get older, calcium becomes increasingly important for maintaining health and preventing disease. Calcium is essential for building and maintaining strong bones, which provide structure and mobility as you age.

Without enough calcium, bones become porous and fragile, increasing risks of fractures and breaks. This can lead to loss of independence and mobility issues.

Heart and Blood Vessels

Calcium impacts the circulatory system by playing a role in blood pressure regulation. Insufficient calcium can cause high blood pressure in older adults.

Calcium also affects heart health by helping maintain a steady heartbeat and proper electrical signaling in the heart. Without enough calcium, irregular heart rhythms can develop.

Muscle Function

Calcium also plays an important role in muscle function. It helps muscles contract properly, including the heartbeat and movements needed for activities like walking, climbing stairs, and rising from a chair.

Insufficient calcium can lead to muscle cramping and weakness.

Helping Your Nerves

In the nervous system, calcium helps transmit signals between neurons. Calcium allows neurons to release neurotransmitters that allow for proper brain and nerve function. Without enough calcium, cognitive decline and issues with coordination may arise.

In summary, adequate calcium levels are important for building and maintaining bone mass and density, regulating blood pressure, supporting heart and muscle function, and enabling proper nervous system signaling. This helps maintain mobility, independence and overall wellness as you age.

Signs and Symptoms of Calcium Deficiency

As we age, it becomes increasingly important to monitor calcium levels and intake. Calcium deficiency, or hypocalcemia, can have significant impacts on your health, mobility, and longevity. Some signs that your calcium levels may be low include:

Muscle Cramps or Twitches

Calcium is essential for proper muscle function and nerve signaling. Without adequate calcium, you may experience involuntary muscle spasms, cramps, or twitches, especially in the legs or feet.

Numbness or Tingling

Calcium deficiency can disrupt nerve function, leading to that pins-and-needles feeling in the fingers, toes, or around the mouth. This numbness or tingling sensation is a result of impaired communication between nerves and muscles.

Fatigue or Weakness

Calcium is vital for energy production in your cells. Low levels of this important mineral can sap your strength and leave you feeling run down. Difficulty concentrating or impaired memory can also occur.

Insomnia or Restlessness

Calcium helps regulate your body's circadian rhythm and sleep-wake cycles. Deficiency may make it difficult to fall or stay asleep, or can cause you to wake up frequently during the night.

Depression or Irritability

Calcium plays an important role in the production and regulation of mood-related neurotransmitters like serotonin. Low levels are linked to symptoms of depression, anxiety, irritability, and mood changes.

Bone Pain or Osteoporosis

Over the long term, lack of calcium leads to bone loss and osteoporosis. You may experience bone pain, fractures, loss of height, or stooped posture. Osteoporosis-related fractures most commonly occur in the hip, wrist or spine.

When to Get Your Calcium Levels Tested

As an adult, especially around 50, it is important to get your calcium levels tested regularly to ensure proper bone and overall health.

When to Start Testing

For most adults, calcium testing should begin around age 40-50, when bone loss starts to accelerate. At this age, both men and women should get a baseline bone density scan and calcium blood test.

After the initial tests, the frequency of retesting depends on your results and risk factors. People with osteopenia or osteoporosis may need more frequent monitoring. Those with normal bone density can usually be retested every 2-5 years.

Ideal Calcium Levels

The ideal range for total calcium in the blood is 8.5 to 10.5 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL).

Levels below 8.5 mg/dL indicate calcium deficiency, which can lead to bone loss over time if not addressed.

High calcium levels above 10.5 mg/dL may indicate hyperparathyroidism or other issues and require follow up with your doctor. They will check parathyroid hormone levels and possibly order additional tests to determine the cause of elevated calcium.

Mito Health's flagship package, priced at $499, offers testing for calcium levels as well as 66 other carefully curated biomarkers that provide insight into various aspects of your health - this comprehensive suite of tests allows for early detection of cancer, heart disease, neurodegenerative disorders, diabetes and more. 

In addition to testing, you will receive a personalized health optimization plan from our doctors incorporating supplements, nutrition, exercise and sleep strategies, and access to exclusive health and longevity events.

Even better - as a member, you get exclusive pricing (20% off market price) for an additional DEXA scan, for an accurate analysis of your bone mineral density, visceral fat levels, and body composition.

Getting Enough Calcium From Food Sources

To maintain adequate calcium levels and support bone and overall health, focus on consuming calcium-rich foods as part of a balanced diet. Some of the best food sources of calcium include:

Dairy products

Such as milk, yogurt, and cheese contain high amounts of calcium. For example, one cup of milk contains approximately 300 mg of calcium, meeting 30-50% of the daily recommended intake. Cheese and yogurt also provide 200-300 mg of calcium per serving.

Fish with edible bones

Canned fish like sardines and salmon contain lots of small edible bones that provide calcium. A one cup serving can have over 300 mg of calcium.

Dark green leafy vegetables

While not as high in calcium as dairy, foods like kale, broccoli, and bok choy still provide a good amount. For instance, one cup of cooked kale has about 90 mg of calcium.

Tofu

Firm tofu contains about 860 mg of calcium per half cup. Tofu can be a good plant-based source of calcium for those avoiding dairy. However, the calcium may be less absorbable from plant sources.

Sesame seeds

Just 1/4 cup of sesame seeds has 351 mg of calcium, more than a cup of milk. They make a great crunchy topping for salads or stir fries.

Almonds

One ounce or about 23 whole almonds contains 75 mg of calcium. While not the highest source, almonds can still contribute to your daily needs, especially if consumed regularly.

Limit Caffeine and Sodium

Too much caffeine and sodium in the diet can interfere with calcium absorption and excretion. Limit coffee and soda intake to 1 to 2 cups per day and avoid adding extra salt while cooking or at the table.

Consuming adequate calcium is vital for maintaining bone health and preventing conditions like osteoporosis. For most adults, the recommended daily intake is 1000 mg per day.

Focus on including a variety of calcium-rich foods as part of a balanced diet and talk to your doctor about whether a calcium supplement may be right for you. Keeping calcium at optimal levels can help support longevity, mobility, and wellness as you age.

Lifestyle Tips to Maintain Healthy Calcium Levels

To maintain healthy calcium levels and support bone health as you age, focus on these lifestyle tips:

Exercise

Engage in regular weight-bearing and muscle-strengthening exercise at least 3 to 4 times per week. Examples of good exercises include:

  • Walking outside or using a treadmill set at an incline for 30 to 60 minutes 3 to 4 times per week. Walking is a weight-bearing exercise that stimulates bone growth and density.
  • Jogging or running outside or on a treadmill for 20 to 30 minutes 3 to 4 times per week. This puts stress on bones which signals them to adapt and become stronger.
  • Strength training using free weights, resistance bands or weight machines targeting all major muscle groups for 20 to 30 minutes 2 to 3 times per week. This type of exercise places mechanical strain on bones which stimulates bone formation.
  • Bodyweight exercises like push-ups, squats, lunges and calf raises done in 2 to 3 sets of 8 to 15 repetitions 2 to 3 times per week. These exercises load bones without external weights.

In addition to frequency, aim for a moderate to high intensity level where you are breathing harder and your heart rate increases but you can still carry on a conversation. Taking breaks when needed is fine. The key is to challenge your muscles and bones in a safe and sustainable manner.

Don't Smoke

Smoking significantly accelerates bone loss and the risk of osteoporosis. If you currently smoke, make quitting a top priority to support bone and overall health. Speak to your doctor about strategies and resources to help you become smoke-free.

Supplements to Support Healthy Bones and Calcium Levels

To support healthy bones and optimal calcium levels, certain supplements may be beneficial for some individuals. However, supplements should only be used under the guidance of your doctor to determine if they are right for you based on your unique health conditions and needs.

Calcium

Calcium supplements, such as calcium carbonate or calcium citrate, can help ensure you consume adequate amounts of this crucial mineral for bone health. The typical dosage for most adults is 1,000 to 1,200 mg per day.

Calcium supplements may be especially important for those who cannot get enough calcium from diet alone. However, too much calcium from supplements can cause side effects like constipation, so you should not exceed the upper limit of 2,500 mg per day.

Vitamin D

Vitamin D helps your body absorb calcium and is essential for bone health and preventing conditions like osteoporosis. If your blood levels of vitamin D are low, your doctor may recommend a supplement.

The typical dosage is 600 to 800 IU per day. Vitamin D supplements may be particularly important for older adults, those with limited sun exposure, and people with dark skin.

Other Supplements

In some cases, other supplements like vitamin K, magnesium, and collagen or bone broth protein powder may provide additional support for bone health. However, there is limited evidence on the benefits of these supplements, and you should always talk to your doctor first before taking them to determine if they are suitable and safe based on your needs.

To maximize the benefits of supplements and reduce risks, you should:

  • Choose a reputable brand that has been tested for quality, safety and accuracy.
  • Follow the dosage recommended on the product label or as advised by your doctor.
  • Tell your doctor about any supplements you are taking to avoid negative interactions with medications.
  • Stop taking the supplement immediately if you experience negative side effects and consult your doctor.
  • Re-evaluate your need for supplements with your doctor on a regular basis based on your diet, health conditions, blood test results, and other factors.

Supplements can be a useful tool for supporting health and wellness when used properly under medical guidance. But the foundation for lifelong healthy bones still remains adequate exercise, nutrition, and healthy lifestyle habits.

Conclusion

In conclusion, calcium is essential for your health and longevity. As you age, calcium levels decline and bone density weakens, putting you at higher risk of osteoporosis and fractures. By understanding your current calcium levels, adhering to the recommended daily intake, and making necessary lifestyle changes, you can build and maintain bone strength for life.

At Mito Health, we specialize in advanced health diagnostics to test your calcium levels (along with 66 other biomarkers) - to form a science-based, personalized health plan to help you optimize your health. Sign up for our flagship package today to take control of your health and your future. 

Kickstart your health optimisation journey from $499 today

Sign Up
Blood, stool and urine tests for in-depth insights into your health and longevity
Health optimisation plan incorporating supplements, nutrition, exercise and sleep strategies
Exclusive access to low-cost add-on tests and retests for one year
The information provided by Mito Health is for improving health and wellness only, and not to be taken as medical advice or medical recommendations.

Calcium in Your 30-50s: More Than Just Healthy Bones

As you age, getting enough calcium is key for healthy bones and much more. Focus on dairy, supplements, and weight-bearing exercises.

As you advance into your 30s and beyond, you likely start to notice some changes in your body that signal your mortality. Your energy levels may decrease, injuries take longer to heal, and you realize that your body is no longer quite as resilient as it once was in your youth.

One of the most important factors determining how you age and how long you will live is the health of your bones and skeletal system. Calcium is essential for building and maintaining bone strength and density, among a host of other functions.

If you want to enjoy an active, independent, and long life well into your golden years, you must ensure you are getting enough calcium and maintaining proper levels.

TLDR: Calcium is essential for building and maintaining bone mass and density as you age.

  • Without enough calcium, bones become porous and fragile, increasing risks of fractures and breaks.
  • Consuming enough calcium through diet and supplements can lower osteoporosis, help maintain mobility, and support a longer lifespan.
  • The best calcium sources are dairy products. Aim for 1000 mg daily through diet. Use supplements if needed.
  • Weight-bearing exercise like walking and strength training also strengthens bones as you age.

What is Calcium?

Calcium is a mineral essential for building and maintaining bone health.  Calcium is also important for other bodily functions like muscle movement, nerve signaling, and maintaining a regular heartbeat.

Why Calcium Matters for Health as You Age

As you get older, calcium becomes increasingly important for maintaining health and preventing disease.

For Strong Bones

As you get older, calcium becomes increasingly important for maintaining health and preventing disease. Calcium is essential for building and maintaining strong bones, which provide structure and mobility as you age.

Without enough calcium, bones become porous and fragile, increasing risks of fractures and breaks. This can lead to loss of independence and mobility issues.

Heart and Blood Vessels

Calcium impacts the circulatory system by playing a role in blood pressure regulation. Insufficient calcium can cause high blood pressure in older adults.

Calcium also affects heart health by helping maintain a steady heartbeat and proper electrical signaling in the heart. Without enough calcium, irregular heart rhythms can develop.

Muscle Function

Calcium also plays an important role in muscle function. It helps muscles contract properly, including the heartbeat and movements needed for activities like walking, climbing stairs, and rising from a chair.

Insufficient calcium can lead to muscle cramping and weakness.

Helping Your Nerves

In the nervous system, calcium helps transmit signals between neurons. Calcium allows neurons to release neurotransmitters that allow for proper brain and nerve function. Without enough calcium, cognitive decline and issues with coordination may arise.

In summary, adequate calcium levels are important for building and maintaining bone mass and density, regulating blood pressure, supporting heart and muscle function, and enabling proper nervous system signaling. This helps maintain mobility, independence and overall wellness as you age.

Signs and Symptoms of Calcium Deficiency

As we age, it becomes increasingly important to monitor calcium levels and intake. Calcium deficiency, or hypocalcemia, can have significant impacts on your health, mobility, and longevity. Some signs that your calcium levels may be low include:

Muscle Cramps or Twitches

Calcium is essential for proper muscle function and nerve signaling. Without adequate calcium, you may experience involuntary muscle spasms, cramps, or twitches, especially in the legs or feet.

Numbness or Tingling

Calcium deficiency can disrupt nerve function, leading to that pins-and-needles feeling in the fingers, toes, or around the mouth. This numbness or tingling sensation is a result of impaired communication between nerves and muscles.

Fatigue or Weakness

Calcium is vital for energy production in your cells. Low levels of this important mineral can sap your strength and leave you feeling run down. Difficulty concentrating or impaired memory can also occur.

Insomnia or Restlessness

Calcium helps regulate your body's circadian rhythm and sleep-wake cycles. Deficiency may make it difficult to fall or stay asleep, or can cause you to wake up frequently during the night.

Depression or Irritability

Calcium plays an important role in the production and regulation of mood-related neurotransmitters like serotonin. Low levels are linked to symptoms of depression, anxiety, irritability, and mood changes.

Bone Pain or Osteoporosis

Over the long term, lack of calcium leads to bone loss and osteoporosis. You may experience bone pain, fractures, loss of height, or stooped posture. Osteoporosis-related fractures most commonly occur in the hip, wrist or spine.

When to Get Your Calcium Levels Tested

As an adult, especially around 50, it is important to get your calcium levels tested regularly to ensure proper bone and overall health.

When to Start Testing

For most adults, calcium testing should begin around age 40-50, when bone loss starts to accelerate. At this age, both men and women should get a baseline bone density scan and calcium blood test.

After the initial tests, the frequency of retesting depends on your results and risk factors. People with osteopenia or osteoporosis may need more frequent monitoring. Those with normal bone density can usually be retested every 2-5 years.

Ideal Calcium Levels

The ideal range for total calcium in the blood is 8.5 to 10.5 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL).

Levels below 8.5 mg/dL indicate calcium deficiency, which can lead to bone loss over time if not addressed.

High calcium levels above 10.5 mg/dL may indicate hyperparathyroidism or other issues and require follow up with your doctor. They will check parathyroid hormone levels and possibly order additional tests to determine the cause of elevated calcium.

Mito Health's flagship package, priced at $499, offers testing for calcium levels as well as 66 other carefully curated biomarkers that provide insight into various aspects of your health - this comprehensive suite of tests allows for early detection of cancer, heart disease, neurodegenerative disorders, diabetes and more. 

In addition to testing, you will receive a personalized health optimization plan from our doctors incorporating supplements, nutrition, exercise and sleep strategies, and access to exclusive health and longevity events.

Even better - as a member, you get exclusive pricing (20% off market price) for an additional DEXA scan, for an accurate analysis of your bone mineral density, visceral fat levels, and body composition.

Getting Enough Calcium From Food Sources

To maintain adequate calcium levels and support bone and overall health, focus on consuming calcium-rich foods as part of a balanced diet. Some of the best food sources of calcium include:

Dairy products

Such as milk, yogurt, and cheese contain high amounts of calcium. For example, one cup of milk contains approximately 300 mg of calcium, meeting 30-50% of the daily recommended intake. Cheese and yogurt also provide 200-300 mg of calcium per serving.

Fish with edible bones

Canned fish like sardines and salmon contain lots of small edible bones that provide calcium. A one cup serving can have over 300 mg of calcium.

Dark green leafy vegetables

While not as high in calcium as dairy, foods like kale, broccoli, and bok choy still provide a good amount. For instance, one cup of cooked kale has about 90 mg of calcium.

Tofu

Firm tofu contains about 860 mg of calcium per half cup. Tofu can be a good plant-based source of calcium for those avoiding dairy. However, the calcium may be less absorbable from plant sources.

Sesame seeds

Just 1/4 cup of sesame seeds has 351 mg of calcium, more than a cup of milk. They make a great crunchy topping for salads or stir fries.

Almonds

One ounce or about 23 whole almonds contains 75 mg of calcium. While not the highest source, almonds can still contribute to your daily needs, especially if consumed regularly.

Limit Caffeine and Sodium

Too much caffeine and sodium in the diet can interfere with calcium absorption and excretion. Limit coffee and soda intake to 1 to 2 cups per day and avoid adding extra salt while cooking or at the table.

Consuming adequate calcium is vital for maintaining bone health and preventing conditions like osteoporosis. For most adults, the recommended daily intake is 1000 mg per day.

Focus on including a variety of calcium-rich foods as part of a balanced diet and talk to your doctor about whether a calcium supplement may be right for you. Keeping calcium at optimal levels can help support longevity, mobility, and wellness as you age.

Lifestyle Tips to Maintain Healthy Calcium Levels

To maintain healthy calcium levels and support bone health as you age, focus on these lifestyle tips:

Exercise

Engage in regular weight-bearing and muscle-strengthening exercise at least 3 to 4 times per week. Examples of good exercises include:

  • Walking outside or using a treadmill set at an incline for 30 to 60 minutes 3 to 4 times per week. Walking is a weight-bearing exercise that stimulates bone growth and density.
  • Jogging or running outside or on a treadmill for 20 to 30 minutes 3 to 4 times per week. This puts stress on bones which signals them to adapt and become stronger.
  • Strength training using free weights, resistance bands or weight machines targeting all major muscle groups for 20 to 30 minutes 2 to 3 times per week. This type of exercise places mechanical strain on bones which stimulates bone formation.
  • Bodyweight exercises like push-ups, squats, lunges and calf raises done in 2 to 3 sets of 8 to 15 repetitions 2 to 3 times per week. These exercises load bones without external weights.

In addition to frequency, aim for a moderate to high intensity level where you are breathing harder and your heart rate increases but you can still carry on a conversation. Taking breaks when needed is fine. The key is to challenge your muscles and bones in a safe and sustainable manner.

Don't Smoke

Smoking significantly accelerates bone loss and the risk of osteoporosis. If you currently smoke, make quitting a top priority to support bone and overall health. Speak to your doctor about strategies and resources to help you become smoke-free.

Supplements to Support Healthy Bones and Calcium Levels

To support healthy bones and optimal calcium levels, certain supplements may be beneficial for some individuals. However, supplements should only be used under the guidance of your doctor to determine if they are right for you based on your unique health conditions and needs.

Calcium

Calcium supplements, such as calcium carbonate or calcium citrate, can help ensure you consume adequate amounts of this crucial mineral for bone health. The typical dosage for most adults is 1,000 to 1,200 mg per day.

Calcium supplements may be especially important for those who cannot get enough calcium from diet alone. However, too much calcium from supplements can cause side effects like constipation, so you should not exceed the upper limit of 2,500 mg per day.

Vitamin D

Vitamin D helps your body absorb calcium and is essential for bone health and preventing conditions like osteoporosis. If your blood levels of vitamin D are low, your doctor may recommend a supplement.

The typical dosage is 600 to 800 IU per day. Vitamin D supplements may be particularly important for older adults, those with limited sun exposure, and people with dark skin.

Other Supplements

In some cases, other supplements like vitamin K, magnesium, and collagen or bone broth protein powder may provide additional support for bone health. However, there is limited evidence on the benefits of these supplements, and you should always talk to your doctor first before taking them to determine if they are suitable and safe based on your needs.

To maximize the benefits of supplements and reduce risks, you should:

  • Choose a reputable brand that has been tested for quality, safety and accuracy.
  • Follow the dosage recommended on the product label or as advised by your doctor.
  • Tell your doctor about any supplements you are taking to avoid negative interactions with medications.
  • Stop taking the supplement immediately if you experience negative side effects and consult your doctor.
  • Re-evaluate your need for supplements with your doctor on a regular basis based on your diet, health conditions, blood test results, and other factors.

Supplements can be a useful tool for supporting health and wellness when used properly under medical guidance. But the foundation for lifelong healthy bones still remains adequate exercise, nutrition, and healthy lifestyle habits.

Conclusion

In conclusion, calcium is essential for your health and longevity. As you age, calcium levels decline and bone density weakens, putting you at higher risk of osteoporosis and fractures. By understanding your current calcium levels, adhering to the recommended daily intake, and making necessary lifestyle changes, you can build and maintain bone strength for life.

At Mito Health, we specialize in advanced health diagnostics to test your calcium levels (along with 66 other biomarkers) - to form a science-based, personalized health plan to help you optimize your health. Sign up for our flagship package today to take control of your health and your future. 

Written By
J. Hsu
December 27, 2023
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Kickstart your health optimisation journey from $499 today

Sign Up
Blood, stool and urine tests for in-depth insights into your health and longevity
Health optimisation plan incorporating supplements, nutrition, exercise and sleep strategies
Exclusive access to low-cost add-on tests and retests for one year
The information provided by Mito Health is for improving health and wellness only, and not to be taken as medical advice or medical recommendations.
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